Overview

Jesse Solomon is the executive director of the Boston Plan for Excellence, which runs a PreK-12 pathway of Teaching Academies – the Dearborn STEM Academy and the Dudley Street Neighborhood Charter School – in addition to the Boston Teacher Residency. Mr. Solomon founded the Boston Teacher Residency program in 2003. Previously, he taught middle and high school math for 10 years at the King Open School in Cambridge, Brighton High School, and City on a Hill Public Charter School. He was a founding faculty member, lead teacher, and a member of the board of directors at City on a Hill, where he began and directed the Teacher’s Institute, a school-based teacher preparation program.

I am excited about the potential for a variety of teacher educators and teacher-education programs to come together to build the field.

Why did you decide to join Deans for Impact?

I joined Deans for Impact because the current way in which we prepare teachers – as a field – falls woefully short of what is needed IF we are to take seriously the idea that every student deserves a great education. And if all really means all.

I don’t think the solution rests solely on the teacher-preparation side. For example, most schools are not set up to enable all children to learn at high levels. And most schools are not set up to enable all teachers to develop and excel. So we will have to work closely with schools, school districts and communities. But teacher-preparation institutions can be a much more proactive and forward-thinking lever in this change.


What is one pivotal moment in your career in educator preparation that left a positive impact on you or others?

I’m not sure I can attest to impact on others. As for me … In the past few years, there have been several young people – whom I had taught when they were high school students in Boston – come through the Boston Teacher Residency program. Watching them decide to become teachers and work hard to prepare, and then getting to see them in classrooms of their own working with students from their neighborhoods, has been quite rewarding.


What most excites you about the opportunity to transform the field of educator preparation in the years ahead?

I think there is an increasing confluence of thinking and research on what works in teacher preparation. There are still a number of structural, financial and policy objectives ahead of us. I am excited about the potential for a variety of teacher educators and teacher-education programs to come together to build the field.


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